Posts Tagged ‘recipe’

We need a little Christmas…

August 25, 2018

 

Christmas Eve by Laura Hope Wood

The snow began to fall as twilight deepened
And swirling flakes fell far into the night.
A fairyland soon covered hill and valley
As drifts piled high in silence deep and white.
There was no sound to break the evening stillness,
But just the feel of Christmas all around.
Somehow the joy and peace that comes with giving
Came with each snowflake as it settled down.
A tall tree trimmed with bright and shining tinsel,
Through frosted windows such a rosy glow
Of presents wrapped in green and crimson tissue
And firelight dancing on the floor below.
A holly wreath with bright red, frosted berries
To greet me as I near the waiting door.
I seem to hear the sound of sleigh bells ringing;
It’s Christmas Eve, and I am home once more.

 

Oven Caramel Corn

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F.  Divide 15 cups popped popcorn (unsalted) between two 13-by-9-inch baking pans; set aside.  In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine ½ cup butter or margarine, 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar, ¼ cup light corn syrup, and ½ teaspoon salt.  Stirring constantly, bring just to a boil.  Remove from heat.  Stir in ½ teaspoon baking soda.  Slowly pour mixture over popped corn, tossing to coat.  Bake 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes.  Makes 15 servings.

 

Poem and recipe from Ideals Christmas magazine 1996

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Traditional Canadian Christmas Dishes

May 25, 2018

Next month I hope to present Canada’s Christmas customs.  Therefore, I am giving you four recipes from the book Christmas in Canada from World Book that are traditionally found in a Canadian Christmas feast.

Fruit Fool

½ cup sweetened whipping cream
1 cup unsweetened applesauce or other fruit puree
¼ tsp almond extract

Whip cream until stiff.  Fold in fruit puree and almond extract.  Chill mixture in refrigerator.  Serve with fresh fruit or shortcake.

Makes 4 servings

 

Mulled Cider

1 quart apple cider
4 or 5 whole cloves
cinnamon stick

In a medium saucepan, mix together ingredients over medium heat; heat well, but do not allow to boil.

Makes 4 servings.

 

Maple Syrup Pie

Pastry for a 9-inch single-crust pie
¼ cup flour
½ cup water
1 cup maple syrup
1 egg, slightly beaten
2 tbsp butter whipped cream

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.  Line 9-inch pie pan with pastry; prick several times with a fork.  Bake pie shell for 10 minutes or until lightly browned.  Allow pie shell to cool.  Mix flour and water until smooth.

In a medium saucepan, stir together flour mixture and maple syrup.  Stir in egg.  Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thick.  Add butter and stir until melted.

Pour mixture into cooled pie shell.  Allow pie to cool at room temperature until set.  Serve topped with whipped cream.

Makes 8 servings.

 

Molasses Taffy

1 cup sugar
1 cup brown sugar
2 cups molasses
1 cup light corn syrup
1 cup water
¼ cup butter

In a large saucepan, mix together sugar, molasses, corn syrup, and water.  Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until temperature on a candy thermometer reaches just below the soft crack stage (268 degrees F) or until sugar is dissolved.

Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until a small amount of mixture threads when dropped into cold water.  Remove from heat and stir in butter.  Pour slowly onto a buttered slab or buttered cookie sheet on a cooling rack.  Allow to cool slightly, then pull with your fingertips, allowing a spread of about 18 inches between your hands.  Fold mixture back on itself.  Repeat this motion rhythmically until the mixture forms a glistening ribbon and the ridges on the twist begin to hold their shape.  Roll mixture into long, thin strips.  Cut into pieces and place on buttered wax paper.

Makes about 2 pounds.

Christmas in Italy – part 1

May 25, 2013

nativity sceneItaly enjoys a wide range of weather conditions during the Christmas season. In southern Italy Christmas is warm and sunny. In Rome, Christmas tends to be chilly and damp, almost Spring-like. In the mountain regions of northern Italy, Christmases are white with a lot of snow, ice, and cold temperatures.

Preparations for Christmas begin in December. People around Sicily also enjoy puppet shows with hand-carved puppets performing fairy tale stories and enacting legendary battle scenes. Storekeepers decorate their shops with lights and greenery. Families visit vibrant Christmas markets looking for presents, goodies, and new figures to add to the home manger scene. In the schools children put on plays, give recitals, and make decorations. People begin visiting friends and family bringing gifts, sharing good food, and visiting as many magnificent nativity displays as possible.

On December 6 many Italians celebrate the feast day of San Nicola (St. Nicholas). All along the Adriatic coast, children anxiously await the visit of the saint with his gifts and goodies he brings.

On December 13 the people of Sicily celebrate the feast day of Santa Lucia (St. Lucy). Tradition says that, on the eve of her day, Lucia travels the countryside accompanied by a donkey carrying baskets loaded with gifts for those she visits. Children leave their shoes on the doorstep along with food for the donkey. Lucia then fills the shoes with presents. On the morning of St. Lucia’s day, a child, usually the oldest daughter of the family, dresses up as Lucia and serves the family breakfast in bed.

The Christmas season really starts in Italy with Christmas Novena. This is a nine-day period of spiritual preparation ending Christmas Eve marked by attending church services.

Christmas Eve is spent with family and for making final preparations for Christmas day. They may enjoy the sights and sounds of Christmas and the smells of the Christmas markets. Some Italians attend midnight Christmas Eve services at their local churches. In Cortina D’Apezzo, a town in northern Italy, families gather to watch the Alpine guides ski down the mountain carrying flaming torches.

Christmas Day arrives with the pealing of hundreds of church bells. The tradition of ringing church bells at Christmas is thought to have begun nearly 1,600 years ago by Bishop Paulinas of Nola. Families spend the day together exchanging gifts, playing games, telling stories, and feasting.

On December 26 a number of Italians celebrate St. Stephen’s Day. Once a day of religious devotion St Stephen’s Day is now spent relaxing or visiting friends and family.

As Christianity spread in Italy in times past the Christmas season was extended to January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany. Cities and towns host Epiphany parades, and people sing songs honoring the three kings.

The following recipe is a favorite at Christmastime in Italy.

Almond Macaroons

1 can (8 ounces) almond paste, cut in pieces
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg whites
Pine nuts

Combine almond paste, sugar, and egg whites in a bowl and work with a spoon until smooth. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto cookie sheets lined with unglazed paper. Top with pine nuts. Bake at 325 degrees Fahrenheit about 12 minutes, or until delicately browned. Cool slightly, then remove cookies to racks to cool. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

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