Posts Tagged ‘family’

Christmas Websites To Explore

August 27, 2017

The Christmas season will be upon us before we know it.  Here are some Christmas website for you to explore now so you can use the information they have to enhance your Christmas celebration and involve all the little ones, and the not-so-little ones also, in your life.

www.christmas.com – This is a fun little website that offers a lot of Christmas fun.  Get new recipes to try, play some Christmas games, listen to some music, and avail yourself of their planning tips for the Christmas season.  One of the nice features on this site are the free family pages.  Families can upload and share Christmas memories and photos.  Let other family members know what recipes you are using for this year’s Christmas feast.  Don’t forget to post your Christmas wish lists.

www.northpole.com – This fun website has been around a long time.  Established in 1996 it has grown to what it is today.  On it you will find fun things for the kids to do, crafts to make, and recipes to try.

www.allthingschristmas.com – This website is a treasure trove of Christmas information and articles.  They also have a presence on Facebook at www.facebook.com/AllThingsChristmas/.  Also look for some Christmas giveaways here.

www.customsofchristmas.com – Don’t forget our own little website.  Find out the origins of many of our Christmas customs and traditions.  In addition to all that you will find games, craft ideas, recipes, and free downloads.  Remember our advent calendar.  It starts on November 29 and goes through Christmas Eve.  Each day you can listen to a 15 minutes segment of the story The Adventures of The Cinnamon Bear.  This story has been loved by thousands of kids and kids-at-heart for many years.

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First and Second Christmas Day in the Netherlands

August 24, 2015

On Christmas morning in the Netherlandsoliebollen many families attend church services especially if they did not attend the previous night.  After church services they return home for Koffietafel, coffee table, an elaborate brunch consisting of such things as smoked salmon or pate and Kerstkrans (a pastry similar to Banketletter shaped like a large wreath decorated with lemon icing, candied fruit, holly, and a red bow).  Families in most areas do not exchange gifts on Christmas day; but for those families who do, especially in the southern regions, Father Christmas brings the gifts.

Because Christmas day is a holiday of family togetherness, many families will either visit the homes of family and friends or entertain family and friends at their homes.  They will talk, play board games, listen to the radio or other recordings, watch television, attend concerts or ballets, and sing and play Christmas carols.  Throughout the day they will snack on Kerstbrood, a sweet bread filled with raisins, currants, and candied fruit peel then dusted with powdered sugar.  If the weather is cold enough during the month of December the family will go to the rivers and canals to enjoy some ice skating.

At approximately 7:00 P.M. Christmas dinner is served.  Poinsettias, holly, fresh flowers, and other Christmas greenery may decorate the table.  In many families either the youngest person or the oldest person at the table reads the Christmas story from the Bible before the meal begins.  The meal may begin with Bitterballen (small croquettes of finely minced veal or beef in an herb-laced gelatin), cocktail meatballs, Zoute Bolletjes or salted bullets (salty dabs of pastry baked to a fine crunch), Groentensoep (vegetable soup), Erwtensoep (pea soup) sometimes served with little fried meatballs, Mossel-Rijstschotel (and Indonesian-style casserole of mussels over cream-smothered rice), Haringsla (herring salad), and Matjes (salted herring).

The main course may consist of rolled beef, roast hare, roast goose, or roast venison.  Turkey is gaining popularity on the Christmas table.  Pureed potatoes seasoned with a variety of spices is also a popular item.  In many homes the Christmas dinner is served using a table-top grill.  Each guest cooks their own bite-sized pieces of meat and vegetables as they eat.  Popular Christmas desserts in the Netherlands are Bessensappudding (tart currant pudding), cookies, and chocolates.

The people of the Netherlands also celebrate Second Christmas Day, December 26.  This is a day to reach out to friends and do things outside the home.  Many people attend performances both professional and amateur at churches, concert halls, and auditoriums.  These performances may be choral, instrumental, or theatrical in nature.  Churches and schools offer choral presentations and Christmas plays often depicting the story of the Nativity.  Families living in and around Rotterdam may attend the Ahoy Kerstcircus (Christmas circus) featuring a live band, aerial acts, animal acts, and clowns.  This circus has performed annually since 1917.

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Oliebollen  (I would love to try these.  They sound good.)

SERVINGS 36

PREP TIME 20 mins  

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped apple (optional)
  • 2 beaten eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup cooking oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Cooking oil for deep-fat frying
  • Sifted powdered sugar

Directions

1.  In a large bowl, stir together flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, and salt; stir in the raisins and, if you like, apple. Make a well in the center. Combine eggs, milk, the 1/4 cup cooking oil, and the vanilla; add to flour mixture. Mix thoroughly.

2.  In a large saucepan or deep-fat fryer, drop by tablespoons, 3 or 4 at a time, into deep, hot oil (365 degree F). Cook about 3 minutes or until golden, turning once. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. Makes about 36.

 

How to have the Christmas you’ve always wanted – part 1

August 17, 2013

This is the first of a nine-part series on having a truly enjoyable Christmas
celebration. Please do the exercises that accompany the posts as they will help
you determine how to make Christmas 2013 a memorable and joyous celebration.
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How was Christmas 2012? Was it all that you wanted it to be, happy and fulfilled
surrounded by a loving, supporting family? Or was it a stressful chore that you
don’t look forward to repeating next Christmas? For many Christmas doesn’t live
up to the joy it promises. People spend more than they can afford, sometimes
much more, on gifts, food, and decor. They take on more responsibility than they
can handle with parties, programs, daily work, and the Christmas celebration
itself. They also spend less time relaxing with their families. Shopping for
gifts, baking, decorating, and making Christmas crafts take up all available
time. It’s no wonder that Christmas is so stressful and busy for so many.

Americans are obsessed with Christmas. News mediums report on community
Christmas celebrations. Business reports and business magazines tell how
Christmas is affecting sales. Newspapers give homemakers practical advice on
hosting the “perfect” Christmas celebration. Women’s magazines strive to have
the best Christmas issue ever with page upon page of crafts, recipes, and ideas
for decorating the house. Even talk shows get into the act inviting
psychologists to diagnose and prescribe treatment for everyone who suffers from
the “Christmas Blues.” This shallow obsession robs the Christmas holiday of much
of the joy many expect to experience at Christmas.

How can we fix this problem and make Christmas a more meaningful and joyful
celebration? To answer this question we need to consider three questions. What’s
it like, for each family member, to go through the holiday season? What’s the
root off people’s problems with Christmas? How can we restore the simplicity and
beauty to the Christmas celebration?

Christmas is very different now than it was a hundred or more years ago. In the
1800’s, preparations for the Christmas celebration didn’t start until
mid-December and the celebration lasted for several days. Now people are buying
and planning the Christmas celebration months in advance for a celebration that
lasts only one day. Family, community, and religious traditions have been
replaced with passive, money-making events where people get into the “Christmas
spirit” by enjoying the work of others. The family celebration hasn’t escaped
either. It has become an elaborate, expensive production where the crafty
decorations found in the latest Christmas issue rule and time for families to
relax and enjoy each other suffers.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be exploring the answers to the above questions.
We’ll look at how Christmas preparations affect each member of the family. We’ll
examine the traditional Christmas homecoming. We’ll also look at what we do to
celebrate Christmas and how we can make our celebrations more meaningful and
less stressful.

The Christmas Pledge
Believing in the beauty and simplicity of Christmas, I commit myself to the
following:
1. To remember those people who truly need my gifts
2. To express my love for family and friends in more direct ways than presents
3. To rededicate myself to the spiritual growth of my family
4. To examine my holiday activities in light of the true spirit of Christmas
5. To initiate one act of peacemaking within my circle of family and friends

The material presented here was taken from the book Unplug The Christmas Machine
by Jo Robinson and Jean Coppock Staeheli published by William Morrow and
Company, Inc.

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